Russian Winter Festival 2005   The first Russian Winter Festival took place on 15 January 2005. Performers included: The Alexandrov Red Army Choir, Russian Soul (Moscow), Karagod (Moscow), the phenomenally talented children’s dance group Makhmud Esambaev Ensemble (Chechnya) and Pelageya (Novosibirsk) and other musicians.    Read more
       
     
   Russian Winter Festival 2006    The Russian Winter Festival in London – a major cultural festival – was celebrated on an annual basis attracting record numbers of visitors to Trafalgar Square each year. The second Russian Winter Festival took place in January 2006.    Read more
       
     
   Russian Winter Festival 2007    Traditionally RWF 2007 showcased music, theatre, entertainment, food and drink, as well as traditional festival activities. Its aim was to highlight Russia's cultural diversity, featuring performers from Moscow and many different parts of the country and various ethnic backgrounds.    Read more
       
     
   Russian Winter Festival 2008    The fourth annual Russian Winter Festival saw the biggest audience turn out on record and put the event as key to London’s top cultural offerings. Thousands upon thousands of people, statistically varied in age and ethnic background, both Londoners and non-Londoners, flocked to London’s iconic centre to enjoy a full day of fun, free entertainment and a taste of Russian delights, both literally and metaphorically.    Read more
       
     
  Russian Winter Festival 2005   The first Russian Winter Festival took place on 15 January 2005. Performers included: The Alexandrov Red Army Choir, Russian Soul (Moscow), Karagod (Moscow), the phenomenally talented children’s dance group Makhmud Esambaev Ensemble (Chechnya) and Pelageya (Novosibirsk) and other musicians.    Read more
       
     

Russian Winter Festival 2005

The first Russian Winter Festival took place on 15 January 2005. Performers included: The Alexandrov Red Army Choir, Russian Soul (Moscow), Karagod (Moscow), the phenomenally talented children’s dance group Makhmud Esambaev Ensemble (Chechnya) and Pelageya (Novosibirsk) and other musicians.

Read more

   Russian Winter Festival 2006    The Russian Winter Festival in London – a major cultural festival – was celebrated on an annual basis attracting record numbers of visitors to Trafalgar Square each year. The second Russian Winter Festival took place in January 2006.    Read more
       
     

Russian Winter Festival 2006

The Russian Winter Festival in London – a major cultural festival – was celebrated on an annual basis attracting record numbers of visitors to Trafalgar Square each year. The second Russian Winter Festival took place in January 2006.

Read more

   Russian Winter Festival 2007    Traditionally RWF 2007 showcased music, theatre, entertainment, food and drink, as well as traditional festival activities. Its aim was to highlight Russia's cultural diversity, featuring performers from Moscow and many different parts of the country and various ethnic backgrounds.    Read more
       
     

Russian Winter Festival 2007

Traditionally RWF 2007 showcased music, theatre, entertainment, food and drink, as well as traditional festival activities. Its aim was to highlight Russia's cultural diversity, featuring performers from Moscow and many different parts of the country and various ethnic backgrounds.

Read more

   Russian Winter Festival 2008    The fourth annual Russian Winter Festival saw the biggest audience turn out on record and put the event as key to London’s top cultural offerings. Thousands upon thousands of people, statistically varied in age and ethnic background, both Londoners and non-Londoners, flocked to London’s iconic centre to enjoy a full day of fun, free entertainment and a taste of Russian delights, both literally and metaphorically.    Read more
       
     

Russian Winter Festival 2008

The fourth annual Russian Winter Festival saw the biggest audience turn out on record and put the event as key to London’s top cultural offerings. Thousands upon thousands of people, statistically varied in age and ethnic background, both Londoners and non-Londoners, flocked to London’s iconic centre to enjoy a full day of fun, free entertainment and a taste of Russian delights, both literally and metaphorically.

Read more